Conjure! Songs Fall 2018

Conjure!

Orin/Songs for the Cemetery Sweeping Ritual, Fall 2018

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Note: The lyric text is not Yoruba or Lucumi (Afro-Cuban languages). It is based on diaspora English, Spanish, Lucumi, and U.S. English conventions of phonetical transcriptions. This is a common way to create written versions of the songs because most practitioners (like myself) in the diaspora don’t speak Yoruba but like to have text archives for teaching and research.
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Most songs are call and response:
A = Akpon, the Lead singer-Call
C = Chorus, everyone else-Response
A/C – means the Lead singer and Chorus sing the same lyrics.
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Egun (Ancestors)

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1.

A/C: Ahh iba’she, iba’she o, Iba Baba, Iba Yeye, iba’she

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2.

A/C: Mojuba o, love and respect to you

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3.

A/C: Mojuba fefe iku (4x) iku o, iku o, n’tela si yo ba Egúngun (2x)

A/C: Mojuba fefe iku (4x) Baba n’la o, Iya n’la o, n’te la si yo ba Egúngun (2x)

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EGUN SONGS-TRANSLATIONS, NOTES & SOURCES
Song 1: Praise and thanks to the ashe (powers) of the Fathers-Baba, and Mothers-Yeye
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Song 2: Mojuba = thank you (pronounced moh you bah)
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Song 3: This song is praise and thanks to the ancestors, and prayer for their spirits to be released and fly to Orun (heaven) to join Egúngun—all elevated and revered ancestors.
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iku = egun; or spirit of death
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I learned these songs from Yeye Luisah Teish.
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Oya

Songs 1, 2 and 3 are often sung together; all are on the recording.
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1. A/C: Ayiloda ’ya ku o, olomo de ke eyo a ya aba

__A/C: Oya de ariwo, Oyansan l’oro sokoto

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(variation — A/C: Oya de ariwo, o mesan l’oro sokoto)

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2. A/C: Oya mi lo ya

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3. A: Oya mi lo ya Oga Bembe

__C: Oya mi lo ya

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OYA SONGS – TRANSLATIONS, NOTES & SOURCES
Songs 1 and 2
Ayiloda (The Revolver who Twists to create), Iya (Mother) long life to you. Olomo (The Owner of Children) arrives, shout for joy. We turn off to meet her.
Oya (the Tearer) arrives noisily. Oya, the Tearer [who] Splits [things] has a tradition of trousers.
(Variation: Oya (the Tearer) arrives noisily. Nine has a tradition of trousers.)
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Song 3
Oya (the Tearer) shakes, twists, tears.
Oya shakes, twists and tears; (she is) the Stout Superior (Oga Bembe).
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Oya has many names, and different roads:
Oya – means the Tearer
Oyansan – means the Tearer [who] Splits [things]
Ayiloda – is The Revolver Who Twists to Create or tornadoes and hurricanes
Oga Bembe – means Stout Superior because Oya is larger and stronger than her husband Shango
L’oro Sokoto – means the tradition of trousers because initiates of Oya wear both skirts and trousers
Mesan – means nine, Oya’s number
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Re Songs 1 & 2
sokoto = show koh toe
Teish 1993; Ololade Tape B 1998; Mason, Orin Orisha, Oya Song 3, p. 347-348; Ros, Track 10, Song 1—Ayiloda Okuo; and Song 2—Oyadde mariwuo
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Re Song 3
Teish 1993; Ololade Tape B 1998; Mason, Orin Orisha, Oya Songs 21 and 21a, p. 354-355; Lazaro Ros, Orisha Aye – Oya (Track 5, Song 4) playlist 7—Oya amiloya
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